2017 Make it Move


Make It Move

by Kathy Mills

Download the materials for this course:

For every action there is an opposite and equal reaction. Learn about action and reaction using common objects to create chain reactions, pulleys, and levers. Then take what you learn and create a fun Rube Goldberg–type machine. Find out how to take this adventure to the next level by completing Tech Talk for the NOVA award.

ADVENTURE REQUIREMENTS

  • Create an “exploding” craft stick reaction.
  • Make two simple pulleys, and use them to move objects.
  • Make a lever by creating a seesaw using a spool and a wooden paint stirrer. Explore the way it balances by placing different objects on each end.
  • Construct a real Rube Goldberg–type machine to complete a task assigned by your den leader. Use at least two simple machines and include at least four steps.

Exploding Craft Sticks

https://frugalfun4boys.com/2013/05/13/build-a-chain-reactionwith-popsicle-or-craft-sticks/
https://www.icanteachmychild.com/craft-stick-explodingboomerangs/
https://blog.science.edu.sg/2012/08/22/the-physics-of-the-popstick-domino-simplified/

Simple machines

https://www.pinterest.com/pin/223280094002218978

Rube Goldberg machine

http://www.rubegoldberg.com/?page=video
http://blog.connectionsacademy.com/build-your-own-rube-goldberg-machine/
https://dailyexplorer.animaljam.com/en/posts/aja-chain-reaction-contraption
http://blog.connectionsacademy.com/buildyour-own-rube-goldberg-machine/

Items you can use

  • Aluminum foil
  • Plastic containers.
  • Cardboard
  • Water bottles.
  • Toilet paper tubes
  • Paper towel tubes
  • Cereal boxes
  • Dominoes
  • Pencils/Dowels
  • Cans (pop, soup, etc.)
  • Batteries
  • Funnels
  • Marbles
  • String
  • Foil
  • Milk carton

Engineering for Kids

https://www.pinterest.com/pin/149674387592205996/

Robotics

Advances in science and technology have created a world of possibilities. Robots of many shapes and sizes can now perform tasks traditionally done by humans—from sensing the speed of a vehicle to sorting items based on color. In this elective adventure, Bear Scouts will learn how different types of robots are used and then create their own simple robotic figures.

ADVENTURE REQUIREMENTS

  1. Identify six tasks performed by robots.
  2. Learn about some instances where a robot could be used in place of a human for work. Research one robot that does this type of work, and present what you learn to your den.
  3. Build a robot hand. Show how it works like a human hand and how it is different from a human hand.
  4. Build your own robot.
  5. Visit a place that uses robots.

Build a robot hand

http://www.instructables.com/id/Robotic-Hand-Science-Project/
https://www.pinterest.com/explore/diy-robot/
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5sZ6HH1B9-E

Build your own robot

http://www.instructables.com/id/Make-a-robot-boat-from-water-bottles/
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jtkzC5hXQB0
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YSqj1c8fBns

Kits from Bristlebots.org come with everything needed to build a bristlebot, with no soldering required.

http://EvilMadScientist.com offers directions with a supply list for building a “brushbot” from a standard toothbrush head (http://www.evilmadscientist.com/2007/bristlebot-a-tinydirectionalvibrobot/).

Robotic Hand Science Experiment

http://www.instructables.com/id/Robotic-Hand-Science-Project/

Evil Mad Scientist Bristlebot

https://www.evilmadscientist.com/2007/bristlebot-a-tiny-directional-vibrobot/

Robotic Hand Science Project

Credit http://www.instructables.com/id/Robotic-Hand-Science-Project/

Step 1: Gather Your Supplies Supplies Needed:

  • Tape
  • Scissors
  • Cardboard/cardstock paper
  • Standard drinking straws (Dollar Store variety is fine)
  • Pearl drink straws or bigger diameter straws
  • Different colored yarn or twine

Step 2: Draw Your Robotic Hand

  1. Trace your hand on a cardboard or cardstock paper.
  2. Cut the traced hand out (cutting it a little bigger than the actual tracing).

Step 3: Creating Joints

  1. Mark your finger joints on the cutout.
  2. Draw straight or curved line across it.

Step 4: Creating Your Robotic Hand

  1. Fold the fingers at the lines.
  2. Cut smaller straws to size (leave a little gap between the lines to facilitate in threading the yarn).
  3. Tape straw pieces to the hand.
  4. Thread yarn through the straw pieces. Each finger will have a length of yarn of its own.
  5. Thread all five pieces of yarn through the bigger straw.

Additional Comments:

The threading part was difficult. If I had a big needle for the yarn, it would have made it easier, but I didn’t. So, I struggled with it. If I do go forward with this one in the classrooms, I think I’ll have to buy big plastic needles for this project.

I had grand plans for making a sleeve that will cover the arm, but I’m not sure I’ll be able to build all of that in an hour let alone a 2nd grader. So, I might still try it, but I probably won’t take it into the classroom.

I think I’ll buy different colored yarns for each finger, so the students will know which finger they are trying to move. With the same colored yarns, it was difficult to figure out which end went with which finger.

Bristlebot: A tiny directional vibrobot

By Windell Oskay on December 19, 2007

The BristleBot is a simple and tiny robot with an agenda. The ingredients? One toothbrush, a battery, and a pager motor. The result? Serious fun.

See YouTube video at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rUSTXUis_ys

The BristleBot is our take on the popular vibrobot, a simple category of robot that is controlled by a single vibrating (eccentric) motor. Some neat varieties include the mint-tin version as seen in Make Magazine (check the video), and the kid’s art bot: a vibrobot with pens for feet.

The starting point is of course the toothbrush. We need one that has more-or-less uniformly angled bristles. (While it may be possible to take one with straight bristles and bend them to suit, I haven’t tried.) If the bristle length is nonuniform (as it is here), it may take scissors to make the bristles all the same.

Cut off the handle of the toothbrush, leaving only a neat little robotics platform.

Next, we need a vibrating pager motor or other tiny motor with an unbalanced output shaft. If you should happen to find a small enough motor you can always add the weight yourself, but usually motors this size are made for pagers anyway. I got mine on eBay for a few bucks; you can also get them at many online stores (http://www.goldmine-elecproducts.com/prodinfo.asp?number=G21950) for example.
The kind that I got are happy to run on almost any common voltage– probably a range of 1-9 V. As a power source, you can use an alkaline or lithium coin cell or watch battery, either 1.5 V or 3 V. To hook the motor to the battery I soldered short copper wire leads to the motor terminals.

The last substantial ingredient is some foam tape. Apply a small piece to the top of the toothbrush robotic platform, which will be used to hold the motor in place.

Attach the motor to the foam tape. The tape provides a spacer so that the rotating weight does not hit the toothbrush head. It also provides a strong, flexible connection to the base that is able to handle the severe vibration that this robot experiences. A first approach to hooking up the battery might be to stand it on end. However, the battery itself is not held in place very well this way and will fall out shortly.

A better method is to bend one of the leads down flush with the foam tape, so that you can stick the battery to the foam tape as well and still make an electrical connection. The other lead contacts the other side of the battery, and the motor can run.

The completed BristleBot, running and ready for action. When you set one down, you may notice that it tends to steer left or right. We have found that battery and motor placement, bristle shape (one stray long bristle can interfere with the motion, and motor rotation direction all influence the behavior- so be sure to try flipping the battery upside down if you have trouble getting yours to go straight.
Now and for the record, this is one of many different kinds of vibrobots– there are a lot of other designs out there if you go and look. We have heard of and seen many other vibrating robots, and we know that even using a brush with angled bristles for propulsion has been done before. However, this particular miniature implementation may be unique, and is certainly fun. Very few robots that you can build so easily are so rewarding. With the right parts, you can make one in a few minutes. It might be great fun to make a bunch of them to race them competitively.

http://www.scouting.org/stem/Awards/CubScout.aspx

Tech Talk

This module is designed to help you explore how technology affects your life each day.

Requirements

1. Choose A or B or C and complete ALL the requirements.

A. Watch an episode or episodes (about one hour total) of a show about anything related to technology. Then do the following:

  1. Make a list of at least two questions or ideas from what you watched.
  2. Discuss two of the questions or ideas with your counselor.

Some examples include—but are not limited to—shows found on PBS (“NOVA”), Discovery Channel, Science Channel, National Geographic Channel, TED Talks (online videos), and the History Channel. You may choose to watch a live performance or movie at a planetarium or science museum instead of watching a media production. You may watch online productions with your counselor’s approval and under your parent’s supervision.

B. Read (about one hour total) about anything related to technology. Then do the following:

  1. Make a list of at least two questions or ideas from what you read.
  2. Discuss two of the questions or ideas with your counselor. Books on many topics may be found at your local library. Examples of magazines include but are not limited to Odyssey, KIDS DISCOVER, National Geographic Kids, Highlights, and OWL or http://owlkids.com.

C. Do a combination of reading and watching (about one hour total) about anything related to technology. Then do the following:

  1. Make a list of at least two questions or ideas from what you read and watched.
  2. Discuss two of the questions or ideas with your counselor.

2. Complete ONE adventure from the following list for your current rank or complete option A or B. (If you choose an Adventure, choose one you have not already earned.) Discuss with your counselor what kind of science, technology, engineering, and math was used in the adventure or option.

Adventures

  • Wolf Cub Scouts: Finding Your Way or Motor Away
  • Bear Cub Scouts: Make it Move or Fix It
  • Webelos Scouts: Build It or Movie Making

Option A: Complete all of the following:

  • Explain these parts of a personal computer: central processing unit (CPU), monitor, keyboard, mouse, modem, and printer.
  • Make a list of ten devices that can be found in a home that use a computer chip to function.
  • Use a spreadsheet program to organize some information.

Option B: Complete all of the following:

  • Point out the major features of a camera to your den or family and explain the function of each part. Parts COULD include memory card, lens, shutter, power on and off, zoom, battery, flash, display panel, case, settings, etc.
  • Discuss with your leader or adult partner the benefits and contributions photography makes to modern life.
  • Use a camera to take at least 10 pictures of your family, pet, scenery; show these to your den.

3. Explore EACH of the following:

  • Look up a definition of the word technology and discuss the meaning with your counselor.
  • Find out how technology is used in EACH of the following fields:
    • Communication
    • Business
    • Construction
    • Sports
    • Entertainment
  • Discuss your findings with your counselor.

4. Visit a place where technology is being designed, used, or explained, such as one of the following:

  • an amusement park,
  • a police or fire station,
  • a radio or television station,
  • a newspaper office,
  • a factory or store,
  • or any other location where technology is being designed, used, or explained.

A. During your visit, talk to someone in charge about the following:

  • The technologies used where you are visiting
  • Why the organization is using these technologies

B. Discuss with your counselor the technology that is designed, used, or explained at the place you visited.

5. Discuss with your counselor how technology affects your everyday life.

1-2-3 Go!

This module is designed to help you explore how math affects your life each day.
Math and physics are used in almost every kind of invention, including cars, airplanes, and telescopes. Math also includes cryptography, the use of secret codes.

1. Choose A or B or C and complete ALL the requirements.

A. Watch an episode or episodes (about one hour total) of a show that involves math or physics. Then do the following:

  • Make a list of at least two questions or ideas from what you watched.
  • Discuss two of the questions or ideas with your counselor.

Some examples include—but are not limited to—shows found on PBS (“NOVA”), Discovery Channel, Science Channel, National Geographic Channel, TED Talks (online videos), and the History Channel. You may choose to watch a live performance or movie at a planetarium or science museum instead of watching a media production. You may watch online productions with your counselor’s approval and under your parent’s supervision.

B. Read (about one hour total) about anything that involves math or physics. Then do the following:

  • Make a list of at least two questions or ideas from what you read.
  • Discuss two of the questions or ideas with your counselor.

Books on many topics may be found at your local library. Examples of magazines include but are not limited to Odyssey, KIDS DISCOVER, National Geographic Kids, Highlights, and OWL or owlkids.com .

C. Do a combination of reading and watching (about one hour total) about anything that involves math or physics. Then do the following:

  • Make a list of at least two questions or ideas from what you read and watched.
  • Discuss two of the questions or ideas with your counselor.

2. Complete ONE adventure from the following list for your current rank or complete option A or B. (If you choose an Adventure, choose one you have not already earned.) Discuss with your counselor what kind of science, technology, engineering, and math was used in the adventure or option.

Adventures

  • Wolf Cub Scouts: Code of the Wolf
  • Bear Cub Scouts: Robotics
  • Webelos Scouts: Game Design

Option A: Complete both of the following:

  • Conduct an opinion survey through which you collect data to answer a question and then show your results with a chart or graph. For example, what is the favorite food of the scouts in your den (chart how many like pizza, how many like cookies, etc.).
  • Conduct and keep a record of a coin toss probability experiment. Keep track of at least 25 tosses.

Option B: Complete both of the following:

  • Interview four adults in different occupations and see how they use measurement in their job.
  • Measure how tall someone is. Have them measure you. Complete in both inches and centimeters.

3. Explore TWO options from A or B or C and complete ALL the requirements for those options. Keep your work to share with your counselor. The necessary information to make your calculations can be found in a book or on the Internet. (See the Helpful Links box for ideas.) You may work with your counselor on these calculations.

A. Choose TWO of the following places and calculate how much you would weigh there.

  • On the sun or the moon
  • On Jupiter or Pluto
  • On a planet that you choose

B. Choose ONE of the following and calculate its height:

  • A tree
  • Your house
  • A building of your choice

C. Calculate the volume of air in your bedroom. Make sure your measurements have the same units—all feet or all inches—and show your work.

Volume = Length × Width × Height   

4. Secret Codes

A. Look up, then discuss with your counselor each of the following:

  • Cryptography
  • At least three ways secret codes or ciphers are made
  • How secret codes and ciphers relate to mathematics

B. Design a secret code or cipher. Then do the following:

  • Write a message in your code or cipher.
  • Share your code or cipher with your counselor.

5. Discuss with your counselor how math affects your everyday life.

Cub Scout Supernova Award

To earn the Cub Scout Supernova award, you must be a Bear or Wolf Cub Scout who is active with a den. With your parent’s and unit leader’s help, you must select a councilapproved mentor who is a registered Scouter. You may NOT choose your parent or your unit leader (unless the mentor is working with more than one youth).

A Note to the Counselor
The Cub Scout Supernova award recognizes superior achievement by a Cub Scout in the fields of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM).
All experiments or projects should be conducted using the highest level of safety protocol and always under the supervision of a qualified, responsible adult.
Tigers are not eligible to earn the Cub Scout Supernova award.
Although it is not a requirement, it is recommended that you earn at least two of the seven Nova awards for Cub Scouts before earning the Dr. Luis W. Alvarez Supernova Award.

Dr. Luis W. Alvarez Supernova Award

For Cub Scouts

This Supernova award can be earned by Cub Scouts like you who want to soar in science.

Requirements

1. Complete the adventure appropriate for your rank and complete option A or option B.

Adventures

  • Wolf Cub Scouts: Code of the Wolf
  • Bear Cub Scouts: Make It Move

Option A: Do all of the following:

  • Keep track of the money you earn and spend for three weeks.
  • Geometry: Select a simple shape or figure. Observe the world around you for at least a week and keep a record of where you see this shape or figure and how it is used.
  • Visit a bank and have someone explain how interest works. Use the current interest rate and calculate how much interest different sums of money will earn.

Option B: Do all of the following:

  • Measure how you use your time by keeping a diary or log of what you do for a week. Then make a chart or graph to display how you spend your time.
  • Measure, mix, and prepare at least two recipes. Share your snacks with family, friends, or your den.
  • Study geometry in architecture by exploring your neighborhood or community. Look at different types of buildingshouses, places of worship, businesses, etc.-and create a presentation (a set of photographs, a collage of pictures from newspapers and magazines, a model) that you can share with your den or pack to show what you have seen and learned about shapes in architecture.

2. Complete the adventure appropriate for your rank or complete option A or B.

Adventures

  • Wolf Cub Scouts: Call of the Wild
  • Bear Cub Scouts: Forensics

Option A: Do all of the following:

  • Go shopping with an adult and use a calculator to add up how much the items you buy will cost. See whether your total equals the total at check out.
  • Explain the meaning of these statistical words and tools: data, averaging, tally marks, bar graph, line graph, pie chart, and percentage.
  • Study a newspaper or online news source, with your parent’s or guardian’s permission, to find as many examples as you can of statistical information.

Option B: Do both of the following:

  • Explain to your den or your Mentor how a meteorologist or insurance company (or someone else) might use the mathematics of probability to predict what might happen in the future (i.e., the chance that it might rain, or the chance that someone might be in a car accident).
  • Predict the probability of a plastic bottle landing on its bottom, top, and side. Then flip it 100 times and keep track of which way it lands. Identify any possible sources of experimental error. Discuss the differences if the bottle is empty or full.

3. Find interesting facts about Dr. Luis W. Alvarez using resources in your school or local library or on the Internet (with your parent’s or guardian’s permission and guidance). Then discuss what you learn with your mentor, including answers to the following questions:

  • What very important award did Dr. Alvarez earn?
  • What was his famous theory about dinosaurs?

4. Find out about three other famous scientists, technology innovators, engineers, or mathematicians approved by your mentor. Discuss what you learned with your mentor.

5. Speak with your teacher(s) at school (or your parents if you are home-schooled) OR one of your Cub Scout leaders about your interest in earning the Cub Scout Supernova award. Ask them why they think math and science are important in your education. Discuss what you learn with your mentor.

6. Participate in a science project or experiment in your classroom or school OR do a special science project approved by your teacher. Discuss this activity with your mentor.

7. Do ONE of the following:

  • Visit with someone who works in a STEM-related career. Discuss what you learned with your mentor.
  • Learn about a career that depends on knowledge about science, technology, engineering, or mathematics. Discuss what you learned with your mentor.

8. Learn about the scientific method (or scientific process). Discuss this with your mentor, and include a simple demonstration to show what you learned.

9. Participate in a Nova- or other STEM-related activity in your Cub Scout den or pack meeting that is conducted by a Boy Scout or Venturer who is working on his or her Supernova award. If this is not possible, participate in another Nova- or STEMrelated activity in your den or pack meeting.

10. Submit an application for the Cub Scout Supernova award to the district STEM or advancement committee for approval.

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